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Human rights: Inflation threatens everyone’s right to development |


Handle Dong Nhan Quyen Association in Geneva on Thursday, Nada Al-Nashif cited the International Monetary Fund (IMF) forecasts that advanced economies will struggle to achieve an average inflation rate of 6.6% by 2022, much lower than the 9.5% rate expected to hit poorer countries.

Ms Al-Nashif added that although the world’s richest countries have seen employment rates return to or exceed pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2021, “most” low-income countries average has not yet recovered from COVID-19 crisis.


Nada Al Nashif, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, speaking at the 51st session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva.

UN photo / Pierre Albouy

Nada Al Nashif, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, speaking at the 51st session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva.

Ukraine’s COVID legacy and suffering

The Coronavirus has “revealed and exacerbated pre-existing inequalities” and establish sustainable growth “for several years in many parts of the world”, the United Nations Acting Chief told the Council, during the biennial discussion on the right to development.

Ms Al-Nashif added that unsustainable sovereign debt burdens have also “burdened” many developing countries because they have negative consequences when it comes to providing social protection. Many countries now face unprecedented fiscal challenges, “including social unrestbecause their hands were tied with expensive debt repayments.

To make matters worse, the acting chief reiterated that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on February 24 resulted in “great human suffering” inside the country and beyond its borders. its world.

The war has also caused new disruptions to global supply chains, Al-Nashif explained, contributing to “a spike in fuel and food prices”, disproportionately affecting women and girls. .


Food insecurity is affecting millions in Burkina Faso (file image).

© UNICEF / Vincent Treameau

Food insecurity is affecting millions in Burkina Faso (file image).

Increasing extreme poverty

Referencing data from the World Bank, it is expected that 75 to 95 million more people will live in extreme poverty this year, compared with pre-pandemic projections, she continued.

She noted that of the 760 million people living in extreme poverty, “there will be 16 million more women and girls than men and boys.” Most – 83.7% – live in only two regions: Sub-Saharan Africa (62.8%) and Central and South Asia (20.9%).

“The confluence of crises has created side effects on food and nutrition, health and education, the environment, peace and security, continue to erode progress towards implementation Agenda 2030 and jeopardize a sustainable post-pandemic recovery,” stressed Ms. Al-Nashif.

Climate change ‘recovery’ fund

In a related warning, a leading independent human rights expert Is called on Thursday to set up a global “recovery” fund to help Countries severely affected by extreme weather events caused by climate change.

Ian Fry, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights in the context of climate changemade his appeal at the conclusion of his official visit to Bangladesh.

Southeast Asian country”Should not shoulder the burden of climate change alone”, he stressed, adding that “for too long, the major emitters have denied their responsibility for the suffering they are causing”.


Heavy rains have washed away towns, villages and infrastructure in Bangladesh.

© UNICEF

Heavy rains have washed away towns, villages and infrastructure in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh is vulnerable

Rights specialist – appointed by Dong Nhan Quyen Association with the possibility of independence in March of this year – said flash floods repeated this year in Sylhet, northeastern Bangladesh, have made women especially vulnerable to the most dangerous effects of climate change.

Because of the emergency, they were forced to walk “long distances to obtain fresh water, putting them at risk of sexual harassment” and denying them access to child care and farming, the Special Rapporteur said. .

He added that rising waters have killed livestock, ruined crops and hoarded seeds, and that the community will take at least two years to fully recover.



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