Lifestyle

8 Adjustments to Transform the Way You Work


Editor’s Note: Looking for creative ways to improve your work-from-home days? This post, originally published in September 2020, is filled with helpful tips that are still relevant today.


Working style is a very personal thing. What works for one person can be an absolute nightmare for the next.

I’ve been in advertising for a decade now, and if you asked me a year ago, I’ll tell you I figured out a lot. I am one morning person (a five-thirty meeting? No, thanks!). My brain can only be in one place at a time (no podcasts for me, please!). And I work best in an office or a coffee shop with lots of noisy people around.

Then, COVID-19 hit the mark. I am working from home only my husband. My anxiety spiked, and my regular 6 a.m. alarm gradually switched to 7, then 8. My productivity increased. I was back to square one.

I have completely transformed everything I have ever known about work. I was forced to check my mistakes, find new habits and learn to cope and grow like a pro.

In the past six months, I’ve completely changed everything I’ve ever known about work. I was forced to check my mistakes, find new habits and learn to cope and grow like a pro.

One day, I’ll look back at 2020 and miss a lot of anger, a lot of stress, and a lot of sadness. But I will also see a lot of personal growth. I hope you can do the same.

Here are eight tips to improve your work-from-home days.

When you go to sleep, listen to your body.

I usually start work at a coffee shop every day at 7am. That allows me to get work done before the reverse meeting dates. And while my brain is definitely working on all cylinders in the morning, it’s pretty dumb perceptively perceptively determining my productivity by the time I open the laptop ( and really not good for health).

I’m still a morning person, but I’ve been much less demanding about my schedule. If I have a hard morning, I sleep by myself. Listening to what my body wants will help reduce anxiety and keep my energy levels up all afternoon.

Bought a monitor already!

Monitors are something many office workers take for granted, but I’ve spent the past 5 years in an open concept workspace where everyone works with laptops. After three months at home, my husband convinced me to buy a monitor. Along with being an overall gamechanger from a productivity perspective, it has improved my posture and removed the strain I put on my eyes from constantly squinting at my laptop.

You don’t want to invest? Ask your employer if you can get a screen that’s been sitting in your lonely office for the past six months.

Lunch break.

When you work from home, the line between work life and home life can easily become blurred. And while I’ve never been a good person for lunch breaks, when COVID-19 hits, I often find myself fully working through lunch.

Forcing myself to take a thirty-minute walk has completely reshaped my afternoons. I find myself with more energy and more creativity after rest and exercise. I listen to podcasts and stay up to date with what’s happening in this wild world. And sometimes, a break from my desk even helps me solve a problem or spark a new idea.

Reflect on your flaws.

I’ve always thought that my greatest skill is that I can call myself a “generalist”. I’m always good full in many things. My main job is managing campaigns, but I’m also good at writing and coming up with creative ideas, and I have enough of an eye for design to become dangerous.

If I let other people do their thing, I’m less stressed and don’t have to work 24/7. And guess? Work often gets better when you have a group of experts doing what they’re best at, rather than a generalized team doing what they’re good at.

It took me years to feel offended that I wasn’t invited to do all that. I realize now this is absurd. But if this year has taught me anything, it’s that if I let other people do their work, I’m less stressed and don’t have to work 24/7. And guess? Work often gets better when you have a group of experts doing what they’re best at, rather than a generalized team doing what they’re good at. Imagine that!

Use work from home to your advantage.

If anything good can happen from being forced to stay home, you can knock off your to-do list while you’re at work. I no longer spend Saturday mornings doing laundry and cleaning the living room. Instead, after completing a task or when I feel stuck at work, I will take five minutes to do something at home. Feeling disappointment? Go water the plants or go see a friend or loved one. Taking a break will help you re-establish when it’s time to get back to work.

Redecorate your space.

Since COVID-19 hit, I’ve probably redone the walls on our upper floor (which doubles as my office) at least four times. My husband says that I “care too much about how things look.” I do! But being in a place that is aesthetically pleasing is what makes me more productive. If I can’t sit in nice cafes every morning, I’ll have to create that space for myself. Plus, I find that solving creative challenges in my surroundings helps me become better at solving them at work.

And Redecorating doesn’t have to be expensive. Just swapping out a print or adding a new piece of decor here or there can change the feel of an entire room. Looking for inspiration? Go to a thrift store or pay Etsy or online retailers like Juniper print shop where you can usually find items for under $50.

Find new ways to create calm.

My candle and essential oil collection has tripled in the past six months. I’m more stressed than ever, but maybe light a candle on my desk or burst into a soothing scent (I’m obsessed with it). Little Barn Apothecary Body Oil) is a really great way to calm yourself down throughout the day.

Remind yourself a few times per day to not clench your jaw, bring your tongue away from the roof of your mouth, drop your shoulders back, and take a deep breath. Can do five minutes of yoga. Your body and mind will thank you.

I’m always amazed at how much stress I carry, so it’s also important to remind yourself a few times a day to draw in your jaw, pull your tongue away from the roof of your mouth, and drop your shoulders back. and take deep breaths. Can do five minutes of yoga. Your body and mind will thank you.

Turn off your camera.

I don’t know about you, but the number of meetings I attend each day has skyrocketed over the past six months. With Zoom taking over the way we work, I find it increasingly tiring to look at myself for 5-7 hours a day. I’m (admittedly) a little RBF and often worry that people think I’m upset when I’m just sitting there listening to them. So I started resting in front of the camera.

While client meetings and brainstorming can certainly benefit from live chat, whenever I’m just listening, I like to take a break so I don’t have to worry about my appearance. mine. It’s the little things that can make the difference.





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